Credit: Canva Pro

Anyone can speak confidently in public. Especially you.

Have you ever looked at the person on the stage, with the microphone, and wondered how they do it? Don’t they suffer panic attacks, a dry mouth, a tongue that suddenly has a mind of its own?*

Everyone can to speak confidently in public. The ability just needs to be unlocked.

(*Yes, everyone suffers from nerves – but they learn the tricks to control their reaction or even make their adrenaline work for them!)

Terrified to triumphant

I will work with you to put public speaking into your comfort zone and fear where it belongs – in the past.

The secret to success can be summed up in four words:

  • Preparation – There are lots of little things you can do in advance of your speech which will make a very big difference to your confidence. Visit the venue in advance, and stand in the presenting space, if possible. If you can deliver a practice speech from the very spot where you’ll present on the day, even better.
    The aim is to create a comfort zone and put your speech in it. When the time comes to deliver, you’ll flow smoothly into perormance mode.
    Do you have a plan in place if your technology fails?
    Do you have cue cards printed out?
    Every eventuality you plan for makes you less anxious and more settled.

  • Practice – Don’t just think it silently, or mutter it quietly to yourself. Say it out loud, like you will on the day. Stand up and move around while you rehearse. Video yourself on your phone and watch your performance back again. Practise in front of a live audience: friends, your partner, work colleagues. While you’re at it, ask for their honest feedback. It’s worth a lot more to to you in advance than after the event.

    These realistic rehearsals will make the experience on the day less unfamiliar and more comfortable.
  • Tricks – we’ve all heard the one about picturing your audience naked: try it if you like, but there are more practical tricks you can turn to.

    One highly effective and instant mood booster is the power pose. Just before speaking or entering the venue, find a private corner where you will not be disturbed for a minute or two. Stand with your legs more than shoulder width apart, spread your arms out wide to the side, smile and say, confidently: “The world is mine!” Try it now – it really works.
    It’s the application of bio-feedback: using your body to influence your mind. My exercise is based on the academic paper published by psychologist Amy Cuddy et al in 2010.

    More obviously, avoid stimulants like caffeine, taurine, etc. Their effects can be magnified in a situation where you are already nervous and leave you agitated.

    Alcohol. Do not try alcohol to settle your nerves! It will dry out your mouth, slow down your thought processes, and generally sabotage all the good work you’ve put in preparing.

  • Techniques – Pause. You may find yourself talking more quickly than usual. This can develop into a vicious circle – the symptom of nervousness fuels self-consciousness, which makes you more nervous and your specch speeds up even more. The solution? Go counter-intuitive and just pause. Give your brain a couple of seconds to catch up and settle down.

    Perhaps you might think that silences from the stage convey that the speaker doesn’t know what to say. Far from it. As a matter of fact, the occasional pause conveys gravitas to a speech. As well as allowing you to gather your thoughts, it helps the audience assimilate your message and makes them focus on what is to come.

Nerves

Nerves are quite natural and even seasoned speakers experience them before a speech. In fact, they are useful and can be your friend, as they give your speech vitality. We will work together to get used to the feeling and learn to welcome it. Sound unlikely? Think of thrill-seekers, doing anything from going on a funfair rollercoaster to base jumping from a skyscraper: they’re chasing the adrenaline you get before your presentation.

It can be fun!

Networking

Many people find the idea of walking into a room full of people and starting up a conversation uncomfortable. Some of my clients have described business networking as terrifying as public speaking.

I can work with you to unlock your latent skills and use your existing strengths to make networking a pleasurable experience you actually look forward to.

Next Steps

Get in touch if you would like to discuss about how we might work together to tap into your potential. Whether you’re looking to improve your mingling skills at business networking meetings or to command attention as a speaker, together we can make it happen.

Call me on 07971 805 163 or

Email me at: bill@precisionpresentation.com.

No time to learn?

If you prefer, I can speak on your behalf. Contact me to discuss my Keynote Speaker service.

 

Credit: Canva Pro

Anyone can speak confidently in public. Especially you.

Have you ever looked at the person on the stage, with the microphone, and wondered how they do it? Don’t they suffer panic attacks, a dry mouth, a tongue that suddenly has a mind of its own?*

Everyone can to speak confidently in public. The ability just needs to be unlocked.

(*Yes, everyone suffers from nerves – but they learn the tricks to control their reaction or even make their adrenaline work for them!)

Terrified to triumphant

I will work with you to put public speaking into your comfort zone and fear where it belongs – in the past.

The secret to success can be summed up in four words:

  • Preparation – There are lots of little things you can do in advance of your speech which will make a very big difference to your confidence. Visit the venue in advance, and stand in the presenting space, if possible. If you can deliver a practice speech from the very spot where you’ll present on the day, even better.
    The aim is to create a comfort zone and put your speech in it. When the time comes to deliver, you’ll flow smoothly into perormance mode.
    Do you have a plan in place if your technology fails?
    Do you have cue cards printed out?
    Every eventuality you plan for makes you less anxious and more settled.

  • Practice – Don’t just think it silently, or mutter it quietly to yourself. Say it out loud, like you will on the day. Stand up and move around while you rehearse. Video yourself on your phone and watch your performance back again. Practise in front of a live audience: friends, your partner, work colleagues. While you’re at it, ask for their honest feedback. It’s worth a lot more to to you in advance than after the event.

    These realistic rehearsals will make the experience on the day less unfamiliar and more comfortable.
  • Tricks – we’ve all heard the one about picturing your audience naked: try it if you like, but there are more practical tricks you can turn to.

    One highly effective and instant mood booster is the power pose. Just before speaking or entering the venue, find a private corner where you will not be disturbed for a minute or two. Stand with your legs more than shoulder width apart, spread your arms out wide to the side, smile and say, confidently: “The world is mine!” Try it now – it really works.
    It’s the application of bio-feedback: using your body to influence your mind. My exercise is based on the academic paper published by psychologist Amy Cuddy et al in 2010.

    More obviously, avoid stimulants like caffeine, taurine, etc. Their effects can be magnified in a situation where you are already nervous and leave you agitated.

    Alcohol. Do not try alcohol to settle your nerves! It will dry out your mouth, slow down your thought processes, and generally sabotage all the good work you’ve put in preparing.

  • Techniques – Pause. You may find yourself talking more quickly than usual. This can develop into a vicious circle – the symptom of nervousness fuels self-consciousness, which makes you more nervous and your specch speeds up even more. The solution? Go counter-intuitive and just pause. Give your brain a couple of seconds to catch up and settle down.

    Perhaps you might think that silences from the stage convey that the speaker doesn’t know what to say. Far from it. As a matter of fact, the occasional pause conveys gravitas to a speech. As well as allowing you to gather your thoughts, it helps the audience assimilate your message and makes them focus on what is to come.

Nerves

Nerves are quite natural and even seasoned speakers experience them before a speech. In fact, they are useful and can be your friend, as they give your speech vitality. We will work together to get used to the feeling and learn to welcome it. Sound unlikely? Think of thrill-seekers, doing anything from going on a funfair rollercoaster to base jumping from a skyscraper: they’re chasing the adrenaline you get before your presentation.

It can be fun!

Networking

Many people find the idea of walking into a room full of people and starting up a conversation uncomfortable. Some of my clients have described business networking as terrifying as public speaking.

I can work with you to unlock your latent skills and use your existing strengths to make networking a pleasurable experience you actually look forward to.

Next Steps

Get in touch if you would like to discuss about how we might work together to tap into your potential. Whether you’re looking to improve your mingling skills at business networking meetings or to command attention as a speaker, together we can make it happen.

Call me on 07971 805 163 or

Email me at: bill@precisionpresentation.com.

No time to learn?

If you prefer, I can speak on your behalf. Contact me to discuss my Keynote Speaker service.

 

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